at the edge of consciousness…where the juice is…

Posts tagged ‘inspiration’

“Peace-Promoting Technology”

From HuffPost Impact, the Blog, Dec. 8, 2015:

Scientists Propose “Peace-Promoting Technology” To Counter Terrorism: An Interview With Quantum Physicist John Hagelin

As governments falter in their struggle to find a solution to unpredictable outbreaks of terror, an international alliance of concerned scientists has offered a possible solution.

The Global Union of Scientists for Peace has recently published an Open Letter to Presidents Obama, Hollande and Putin–and to the leaders of all nations–proposing a scientific alternative to the conventional approach of creating peace through force or violence (International New York Times, December 3, 2015).

In the following interview, Quantum Physicist John Hagelin, President of the Global Union of Scientists for Peace, answers questions about this novel approach.

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Dr. Hagelin received his Ph.D. from Harvard University, and conducted pioneering research at CERN (the European Center for Particle Physics) and SLAC (the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center). He is responsible for the development of a highly successful grand unified field theory based on the superstring, and his scientific contributions include some of the most cited references in the physical sciences.

Your open letter in the Times offers an explanation of the root cause of terrorism: deep-rooted societal stress. Could you summarize? 

It is the overwhelming consensus of experts in the field of conflict resolution that the first stage in the emergence of war is mounting societal stress–acute political, ethnic and religious tensions among rival factions in critical hot-spots throughout the world. If these tensions continue to grow unchecked, they eventually reach a boiling point. Then they inevitably erupt in social violence: crime, war, and terrorism. If we can defuse these societal tensions before they erupt–even a little–they do not break out into social violence. Water does not boil at 99 degrees centigrade.

‘Collective consciousness’ is a term that means the sum total of all the individual consciousnesses that make up a society. Stressed individuals create (more…)

gratitude is health-making…

Article by Ocean Robbins, posted in “Huffpost Healthy Living“, 1/4/12:

The Neuroscience of Why Gratitude Makes Us Healthier

Our world is pretty messed up. With all the violence, pollution and crazy things people do, it would be easy to turn into a grouchy old man without being either elderly or male. There’s certainly no shortage of justification for disappointment and cynicism.But consider this: Negative attitudes are bad for you. And gratitude, it turns out, makes you happier and healthier. If you invest in a way of seeing the world that is mean and frustrated, you’re going to get a world that is, well, more mean and frustrating. But if you can find any authentic reason to give thanks, anything that is going right with the world or your life, and put your attention there, then statistics say you’re going to be better off.

Does this mean to live in a state of constant denial and put your head in the sand? Of course not. Gratitude works when you’re grateful for something real. Feeling euphoric and spending money like you just won the lottery when you didn’t is probably going to make you real poor, real quick. But what are you actually grateful for? It’s a question that could change your life. It’s a question that could change your life.

Recent studies have concluded that the expression of gratitude can have profound and positive effects on our health, our moods and even the survival of our marriages.

As Drs. Blaire and Rita Justice reported for the University of Texas Health Science Center, “a growing body of research shows that gratitude is truly amazing in its physical and psychosocial benefits.”

In one study on gratitude, conducted by Robert A. Emmons, Ph.D., at the University of California at Davis and his colleague Mike McCullough at the University of Miami, randomly assigned participants were given one of three tasks. Each week, participants kept a short journal. One group briefly described five things they were grateful for that had occurred in the past week, another five recorded daily hassles from the previous week that displeased them, and the neutral group was asked to list five events or circumstances that affected them, but they were not told whether to focus on the positive or on the negative. Ten weeks later, participants in the gratitude group felt better about their lives as a whole and were a full 25 percent happier than the hassled group. They reported fewer health complaints, and exercised an average of 1.5 hours more.

In a later study by Emmons, people were asked to write every day about things for which they were grateful. Not surprisingly, this daily practice led to greater increases in gratitude than did the weekly journaling in the first study. But the results showed another benefit: Participants in the gratitude group also reported offering others more emotional support or help with a personal problem, indicating that the gratitude exercise increased their goodwill towards others, or more tehnically, their “pro-social” motivation.

Another study on gratitude was conducted with adults having congenital and adult-onset neuromuscular disorders (NMDs), with the majority having post-polio syndrome (PPS). Compared to those who were not jotting down their blessings nightly, participants in the gratitude group reported more hours of sleep each night, and feeling more refreshed upon awakening. The gratitude group also reported more satisfaction with their lives as a whole, felt more optimism about the upcoming week, and felt considerably more connected with others than did participants in the control group.

Perhaps most tellingly, the positive changes were markedly noticeable to others. According to the researchers, “Spouses of the participants in the gratitude (group) reported that the participants appeared to have higher subjective well-being than did the spouses of the participants in the control (group).”

There’s an old saying that if you’ve forgotten the language of gratitude, you’ll never be on speaking terms with happiness. It turns out this isn’t just a fluffy idea. Several studies have shown depression to be inversely correlated to gratitude. It seems that the more grateful a person is, the less depressed they are. Philip Watkins, a clinical psychologist at Eastern Washington University, found that clinically depressed individuals showed significantly lower gratitude (nearly 50 percent less) than non-depressed controls.

Dr. John Gottman at the University of Washington has been researching marriages for two decades. The conclusion of all that research, he states, is that unless a couple is able to maintain a high ratio of positive to negative encounters (5:1 or greater), it is likely the marriage will end.

With 90 percent accuracy, Gottman says he can predict, often after only three minutes of observation, which marriages are likely to flourish and which are likely to flounder. The formula is that for every negative expression (a complaint, frown, put-down, expression of anger) there needs to be about five positive ones (smiles, compliments, laughter, expressions of appreciation and gratitude).

Apparently, positive vibes aren’t just for hippies. If you want in on the fun, here are some simple things you can do to build positive momentum toward a more happy and fulfilling life:

1) Keep a daily journal of three things you are thankful for. This works well first thing in the morning, or just before you go to bed.

2) Make it a practice to tell a spouse, partner or friend something you appreciate about them every day.

3) Look in the mirror when you are brushing your teeth, and think about something you have done well recently or something you like about yourself.

Sure this world gives us plenty of reasons to despair. But when we get off the fast track to morbidity, and cultivate instead an attitude of gratitude, things don’t just look better — they actually get better. Thankfulness feels good, it’s good for you and it’s a blessing for the people around you, too. It’s such a win-win-win that I’d say we have cause for gratitude.

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how beautiful you are…

  

Thank you, Byron Katie.

 

accelerating radical bliss…

lifebeforedeath
by Rick Cowley at isurflife.com:

Fyckit List* Contest ~ Win a free SURF LIFE Bali Yoga & Surf Retreat in 2015

(valued at USD $2395)

Submissions due by Dec. 30, 2014 — just do it NOW

*Fyckit List = Five year bucket list

If you knew you were going to die in five years, what would you want to be ~ do ~ have in that time?

This list is a powerful tool for orienting your life around what inspires you. To live these dreams you’re going to have to regularly say “fyckit, I’m going for it”.

Click here to learn more–and accelerate your radical bliss!

what makes you come alive?!

photo by Rick Cowley

photo by Rick Cowley

“Don’t ask yourself what the world needs; ask yourself what makes you come alive. And then go and do that. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.”
– Harold Whitman

 

hack your brain’s default mode with meditation…

Published by Big Think on Aug 19, 2014:

Dan Harris explains the neuroscience behind meditation, but reminds us that the ancient practice isn’t magic and likely won’t send one floating into the cosmic ooze. He predicts that the exercise will soon become regularly scheduled maintenance, as commonplace as brushing your teeth or eating your veggies. Harris, an ABC News correspondent, was turned on to meditation after a live, on-air panic attack. His latest book is 10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found Self-Help That Actually Works–A True Story (http://goo.gl/wfSX4E).

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rich in every way is full of life!

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to do…to be…what?

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the truth about global violence, pt 2

 from PETER DIAMANDIS’ blog, 7/29/14:

Last week, I shared two key datasets showing that global violence is going down.

This week, I’ve got even more proof for you.

This is one of the most important areas you can share with your friends and family, especially if they have a negative mindset.

Nothing gets us down more than watching violence on television or reading about war and brutality in the newspaper. The truth is, there’s a massive reduction in the amount of violence around the world.

The following graph comes from data in the FBI National Crime Victimization Survey. It depicts the rapes reported in the Bureau of Justice Victimization between 1970 and 2010.

On this curve, and in the next curve, you’ll see the impact of the World Wide Web on violence.

You might hear people decry the loss of privacy in today’s world, but radical transparency is dramatically reducing violence everywhere. Most violent things happen in the dark when no one’s watching, whether it’s an oppressive dictator or someone causing violence in the inner city.

As sensors and networks continue to expand around the world, we’ll see violence drop even further. After all, when there’s a danger that your actions can be caught on tape and shown around the world, you’re more responsible for your behavior.

Here’s another one that shows the impact of transparency. This is trends by armed conflict and the impact on the World Wide Web. We do see an increase in violence here from the 1960s to the 1990s. Watch what happened in 1993 when the Web started reporting this violence, though.

This last graph is the rate of non-fatal firearm crime between 1993 and 2011. Again, watch what happens as the World Wide Web gains popularity: gun violence plummets.

The Web and level of transparency has an extraordinary effect on what people do or don’t do in public.

I hope you share this with your friends and family. Because regardless of what the news media will tell you, we are living in a world that is more peaceful and more abundant than ever before.

Click here for a video version of this blog:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VCsQAoY6H1I

To sign up to Peter Diamindis’ blog, go to: www.AbundanceHub.com.

 

the truth about global violence…it’s way down…

By Peter Diamandis:

I call CNN the Crisis News Network (or the Calamity News Network), delivering all crisis, all the time…

Today’s news media is a drug pusher, and negative news is their drug.

It might interest you to know that violence around the world has actually been going down, and has been for some time.

Your chances of dying a violent death are 1/500th of what they used to be during medieval times.

We’re blind to this fact, because our brains pay 10 times more attention to negative news than positive news. I wrote about these cognitive biases in Abundance.

Let’s take a look at the data that backs this up.deathsduetowar

This graph shows deaths due to war between 1900 and 2005. You’ll notice clear spikes during World War I and World War II.

Check out this next graph.

waningofwar

Here, you’ll see the types of battles fought since 1940, and every classification — colonial, interstate, civil, and civil without foreign intervention — has dropped off drastically over time.

But this isn’t the impression you get from watching the news every night, is it?

Today, every skirmish in every part of the planet is broadcast straight into your living room live, in HD… over and over again.

But when we look at the data, the amount of warfare and deaths by human hands are reducing globally.

What do I do to counter this barrage of negative news? I’ve stopped watching TV news. They couldn’t pay me enough money.

I get my news from selected Google News and my social feed. Try it. You’d be amazed at how much happier you’ll be.

To sign up to Peter Diamandis’ blog, go to AbundanceHub.com 

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